Life Stage Care

At Quail Corners Animal Hospital, we follow your pet through the many phases of their lives. From specialized and preventative care during their younger years to regular wellness checks as they age in order to prevent and detect problems before they arise. We know your pet is important to you, that's why we work hard to ensure they are given only the best in care through all the years of their lives. Read below for more information on life stage care for your pet.

Puppy & Kitten Care

Like You, We’re Softies for Puppies and Kittens

Welcoming a new pet into your home is an exciting time. Some people say getting a new pet is sort of like falling in love. We share your joy, but our primary role is to help you get that new puppy or kitty on the path of good health.

Count on Quail Corners Animal Hospital to provide the necessary veterinary attention that is required in those early weeks and months. It’s also likely you’ll have questions on diet, behavior, grooming, training, and more. We’re here to help. Consider us your reliable resource for supportive and friendly advice.

Caring for Your New Puppy or Kitten

First Check Up

Generally, try to set your first visit within 24–72 hours from bringing your new pet home. Bring any medical or adoption records you have and a stool sample. During that first exam, we’ll examine your pet thoroughly. It is very common for puppies and kittens to have fleas and/or intestinal parasites. To avoid flea infestation or transfer of worms and parasites, you’ll want immediate treatment. We’ll also begin vaccinations. During a pet’s infancy, mother’s milk provides much-needed immunity from disease. Once the pet is weaned, vaccinations play a key role in ensuring health.

Spaying or Neutering

Unless you plan to breed your cat or dog, we highly recommend that pets are spayed or neutered at 5–6 months. Early spaying or neutering can prevent many health issues, such as mammary tumors and pyometra, and unwanted behaviors, such as roaming and territorial aggression. “Fixing” your pet also prevents overpopulation and unwanted heat cycles and pregnancies.

Read more about how to care your new puppy or kitten here,including the important step of puppy or kitten proofing your home to keep them safe from ordinary household toxins and dangers.

Dog Wellness

Adult Care for Dogs

Our goal is to keep your dog active and happily frolicking at your side for as long as possible.

Annual exams and preventive medicine are critical to your dog’s wellness. It is far better to fend off disease than to treat something in an advanced state. Further, seeing your dog well or “normal” helps us to better diagnose if he or she does fall ill. Also, in circumstances where there is not the urgency and stress of a specific veterinary problem, there’s ample time for discussion of nutrition, flea control, vaccine development, and other educational topics.

What to Expect at Your Dog’s Annual Exam

  • A thorough physical exam from ears to tail (eyes, teeth, lungs, abdomen, heart, weight, skin and coat, etc.)
  • Behavioral questions (water consumption, diet, energy, litter box, etc.), often revealing underlying medical issues
  • Vaccine updates
  • Ova and parasite tests to determine if intestinal parasites are present
  • Blood profile tests to reveal evidence of cancer, thyroid or kidney issues, diabetes, infection, inflammation, etc.
  • Other tests that may be indicated; for example, urinalysis

At home “self-checks” are also valuable as a way to monitor your dog’s health.

Cat Wellness

Exceptional Care for Adult Cats

Like you, we love our feline friends and wish them a lengthy and enjoyable life. At Quail Corners Animal Hospital, we emphasize preventive medicine and cat wellness visits.

Annual preventative care exams can catch early warning signs of disease and are critical to ensuring the health of your cat. Felines are masters at hiding illness or discomfort, since in the wild appearing sick made them more vulnerable to predators. Particularly with cats, behavior issues are often linked to illness. For example, litter box issues can signal urinary tract issues or marked thirst can indicate diabetes.

An annual preventive care exam is well worth the time and expense, since it can nip problems in the bud and ensure better health and a longer life for your cat.

What to Expect at Your Cat’s Annual Exam

  • A thorough physical exam from ears to tail (eyes, teeth, lungs, abdomen, heart, weight, skin and coat, etc.)
  • Behavioral questions (water consumption, diet, energy, litter box, etc.), often revealing underlying medical issues
  • Vaccine updates
  • Ova and parasite tests to determine if intestinal parasites are present
  • Blood profile tests to reveal evidence of cancer, thyroid or kidney issues, diabetes, infection, inflammation, etc.
  • Other tests that may be indicated; for example, urinalysis

At home “self-checks” are also valuable as a way to monitor your cat’s health.

Senior Pet Care

Keeping Senior Pets Active & Healthy

The good news is that pets are living longer than ever through better nutrition and vet care combined with more responsible pet ownership. But, just as is the case with humans, middle age and senior years necessitate more vigilance around health, including more frequent exams and medical tests. Senior pets should be seen for an exam twice each year and receive lab work annually. Trust us to help keep your dog or cat comfortable during his or her senior years.

Q: When does my pet get old, anyway?

A: For cats, the senior years begin between 8–10 years of age. Dogs will vary by breed and size, and some dogs are considered senior at 7. The senior years are the last 25% of the animal’s life expectancy.

Q: What changes can I expect in my aged pet?

A: You may notice a general “slowing down” and loss of mental or sensory acuity. Sight, hearing, taste, and smell may be diminished. Your pet is also at higher risk for age-related illnesses or diseases.

Q: What diseases are common to senior dogs and cats?

A: Common age-related difficulties include:

  • Kidney, heart, and liver disease
  • Diabetes, thyroid problems, and other hormone disorders
  • Cancers and tumors
  • Incontinence and behavior issues
  • Loss of mobility and joint pain

Q. How can I best care for my senior pet?

A: You will want to increase the frequency of exams to twice a year, since early detection is critical. It is likely that we will run more diagnostics, such as lab, blood, and imaging tests. At home, keep your pet active and include playing and training in his or her routine. Follow a healthy diet, keep your pet’s weight under control, and follow any special veterinary diets we prescribe.